Ban live export Action Alert

Demand justice for Pakistan sheep massacre victims

Exporter escapes penalty for Pakistan sheep massacre

An Australian government investigation has failed to hold anyone to account for the brutal mass slaughter of tens of thousands Australian sheep in Pakistan last year. Take action below to spare other animals a similar fate.

Demand justice for Pakistan sheep massacre victims

It was the worst live export disaster in history. In September and October 2012, Australians watched in horror as one-by-one thousands of sheep were stabbed, clubbed and buried alive in muddy trenches in a feedlot in Pakistan — some still alive hours later.

The 20,000 Australian sheep had been unloaded in Karachi after being rejected by their original destination, Bahrain, for disease fears. Inconceivably, nobody told Pakistan about this rejection and the horror that befell each animal can be traced back to this one glaring omission.

When the truth inevitably came out in the media, suspicions ran high and the order to 'cull' the sheep was given. No longer deemed fit for human consumption, the animals were 'despatched' in the most horrendous way imaginable.

Any proper investigation would have concluded that the exporter's (Wellard) failure to advise the Pakistan government of the history of this shipment led to this brutal 'cull'.

Yet Wellard faced no proper investigation and as a result ... will face no repercussions.

This deeply flawed inquiry has served one purpose only — to protect the interests of the live export industry.

The Department of Agriculture's report failed to inquire as to why Bahrain rejected these sheep; why they refused to unload them when a government to government agreement should have ensured that they did; why the exporter could elect Pakistan as their contingency plan when it was not even approved to take Australian animals when the ship left Australia; why the exporter did not tell Pakistan authorities that the sheep had first been rejected by Bahrain; and what role this omission played in the brutal cull that followed.

The Australian government's live export regulations are supposed to ensure that when things go wrong — as they do in this volatile trade — those responsible can be held accountable.

For the 20,000 innocent victims who endured the most terrifying and brutal death — justice has not been served. What’s worse, the Department of Agriculture's failure to fully investigate the biggest catastrophe in the already-dismal history of the live export trade — has effectively given the exporter a 'get out of jail free card'.

Don’t let this disaster and the government’s failure to take action go unchallenged. Send an instant message to your MP today urging them to support an end to this cruel and uncontrollable trade and demand that responsibility for animal welfare be removed from the conflicted Department of Agriculture.


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